Orthodontics at a low price and monthly payments for advanced braces: aligners, lingual or transparent. Orthodontist Lausanne and canton of Neuchâtel: Swiss Romande of Vaud, Genève, Valais, Fribourg, Jura. The triangle of north Vaud - south Friburg - Neuchâtel.

What is orthodontics?

Orthodontics is the branch of dentistry that specializes in the diagnosis, prevention and treatment of dental and facial irregularities.

What is an orthodontist?

An orthodontist is a dentist who attended a specialty educational program for advanced specialty training for a period of two to the three years following dental school.

What is a Board Certified orthodontist?

An American Board Certified orthodontist has taken a written test and has shown clinical cases to a specialty examining board approved by the American Dental Association and American Association of Orthodontists. Approximately 25% of orthodontists in the United States are Board Certified.

What are the possible benefits of orthodontics?

  • A more beautiful smile
  • Increased ability to clean the teeth
  • Reduced appearance-consciousness during critical development years
  • Better long-term health of teeth and gums
  • Improved oral function
  • Helps to guide the permanent teeth into more favorable positions
  • Reduces the risk of injury to protruded front teeth
  • Possible increase in self-confidence
  • A more attractive smile
  • Reduced appearance-consciousness during critical development years
  • Better function of the teeth
  • Possible increase in self-confidence
  • Increased ability to clean the teeth
  • Improved force distribution and wear patterns of the teeth
  • Better long-term health of teeth and gums
  • Guide permanent teeth into more favorable positions
  • Reduce the risk of injury to protruded front teeth
  • Aids in optimizing other dental treatment

What are some signs that braces may be needed?

  • Upper front teeth protrude excessively over the lower teeth, or are bucked
  • Upper front teeth cover the majority of the lower teeth when biting together (deep bite)
  • Upper front teeth are behind or inside the lower front teeth (underbite)
  • The upper and lower front teeth do not touch when biting together (open bite)
  • Crowded or overlapped teeth
  • The center of the upper and lower teeth do not line up
  • Finger or thumb sucking habits which continue after six or seven years old
  • Difficulty chewing
  • Teeth wearing unevenly or excessively
  • The lower jaw shifts to one side or the other when biting together
  • Spaces between the teeth

What is the appropriate age to begin orthodontic treatment?

Orthodontic treatment can be started at any age. Many orthodontic problems are easier to correct if detected at an early age before jaw growth has slowed. Early treatment may mean that a patient can avoid surgery and more serious complications. The American Association of Orthodontists recommends that every child first visit an orthodontist by age 7 or earlier if a problem is detected by parents, the family dentist, or the child's physician.

The American Association of Orthodontists recommends that all patients be seen for an orthodontic examination by age 7. Many severe problems can be prevented from fully developing by initiating early orthodontic treatment. It is best to be seen by an orthodontist at approximately age 7 to determine if they have orthodontic problems and when would be the appropriate time for the orthodontist to intervene with the treatment of these problems.

It is best for the orthodontist to see children by age 7 to advise if orthodontic treatment is required and it is the best time for that patient to be treated. The first permanent molars and incisors have usually come in by that time and crossbites, crowding, and other problems can be evaluated. When treatment is begun early, the orthodontist can guide the growth of the jaw and guide incoming permanent teeth. Early treatment can also regulate the width of the upper and lower dental arches, gain space for permanent teeth, avoid the need for permanent tooth extractions, reduce likelihood of impacted permanent teeth, correct thumb-sucking, and eliminate abnormal swallowing or speech problems. In other words, early treatment can simplify later treatment.

For children

It is best for the orthodontist to see children by age 7 to advise if orthodontic treatment is required and it is the best time for that patient to be treated. The first permanent molars and incisors have usually come in by that time and crossbites, crowding, and other problems can be evaluated. When treatment is begun early, the orthodontist can guide the growth of the jaw and guide incoming permanent teeth. Early treatment can also regulate the width of the upper and lower dental arches, gain space for permanent teeth, avoid the need for permanent tooth extractions, reduce likelihood of impacted permanent teeth, correct thumb-sucking, and eliminate abnormal swallowing or speech problems. In other words, early treatment can simplify later treatment.

How do braces work?

Braces use steady gentle pressure to gradually move teeth into their proper positions. The brackets that are placed on your teeth and the archwire that connects them are the main components. When the archwire is placed into the brackets, it tries to return to its original shape. As it does so, it applies pressure to move your teeth to their new, more ideal positions.

Do braces hurt?

The placement of bands and brackets on your teeth does not hurt. Once your braces are placed and connected with the archwires you may feel some soreness of your teeth for one to four days. Your lips and cheeks may need one to two weeks to get used to the braces on your teeth.

We use the most current technology for orthodontic movement of teeth. These latest technological advances have made treatment more comfortable for patients. The orthodontic braces are smaller and smoother, plus gentle wires provide continuous light forces over a period of time. Typically the patient is not uncomfortable while in the office but will experience some discomfort for two to three days after each adjustment. Over-the-counter pain relievers such as Advil or Tylenol can be taken for sore teeth.

Will braces affect playing sports?

No. It is recommended, however, that patients protect their smiles by wearing a mouthguard when participating in any sporting activity. Mouthguards are inexpensive, comfortable, and come in a variety of colors and patterns.

You should be able to play just about any sport or activity, although we highly recommend wearing a mouth guard in contact sports or any sport where there is a chance you could be hit in the face. We have complimentary mouth guards available in our office that will work well with braces.

Can I play a musical instrument with braces?

No. However, there may be an initial period of adjustment. In addition, brace covers can be provided to prevent discomfort.Yes, however there may be an initial adjusting period. We provide complimentary brace guards to prevent any discomfort.

Is orthodontic treatment only to improve your smile?

Orthodontics will not only improve the smile but will improve the alignment and the fit of the teeth. Crooked teeth can result to cavities or gum disease and a bad bite can lead to chewing problems and possible muscle soreness and jaw joint discomfort. Orthodontics allows you the benefit of healthier teeth, a better bite and a beautiful smile.

What is Phase I Treatment?

Interceptive or early treatment is initiated at 7 to 9 years of age for severe bit problems. Some problems must be treated at a younger age to produce the best orthodontic result. If a severe problem is delayed to a later age, a complete correction may not be possible. Early orthodontic treatment can sometimes avoid extractions of permanent teeth and can produce a more stable result. Phase I treatment is typically for 12 to 18 months, followed by retainers for several years, until all permanent teeth erupt. Some patients require Phase II (full braces) at approximately age 12 to finish the correction of the bite problem.

Phase I, or early interceptive treatment, is limited orthodontic treatment (i.e. expander or partial braces) before all of the permanent teeth have erupted. Such treatment can occur between the ages of six and ten. This treatment is sometimes recommended to make more space for developing teeth, correction of crossbites, overbites, and underbites, or harmful oral habits. Phase II treatment is also called comprehensive treatment because it involves full braces when all of the permanent teeth have erupted, usually between the ages of eleven and thirteen.

First Phase Treatment: Your foundation for a lifetime of beautiful teeth

The goal of first phase treatment is to develop the jaw size in order to accommodate all the permanent teeth and to relate the upper and lower jaws to each other. Children sometimes exhibit early signs of jaw problems as they grow and develop. An upper and lower jaw that is growing too much or not enough can be recognized at an early age. If children after age 6 are found to have this jaw discrepancy, they are candidates for early orthodontic treatment.

  • Planning now can save your smile later

    Because they are growing rapidly, children can benefit enormously from an early phase of orthodontic treatment utilizing appliances that direct the growth relationship of the upper and lower jaws. Thus, a good foundation can be established, providing adequate room for eruption of all permanent teeth. This early correction may prevent later removal of permanent teeth to correct overcrowding and/or surgical procedures to align the upper and lower jaws. Leaving such a condition untreated until all permanent teeth erupt could result in a jaw discrepancy too severe to achieve an ideal result with braces.

  • Making records to determine your unique treatment

    Orthodontic records will be necessary to determine the type of appliances to be used, the duration of treatment time, and the frequency of visits. Records consist of models of the teeth, x-rays, and photographs.

Resting Period

In this phase, the remaining permanent teeth are allowed to erupt. Retaining devices are not usually recommended since they may interfere with eruption. It is best to allow the existing permanent teeth some freedom of movement while final eruption of teeth occurs. A successful first phase will have created room for teeth to find an eruption path. Otherwise, they may become impacted or severely displaced.

  • Monitoring your teeth's progress

    In other words, at the end of the first phase of treatment, teeth are not in their final positions. This will be determined and accomplished in the second phase of treatment. Selective removal of certain primary (baby) teeth may be in the best interest of enhancing eruption during this resting phase. Therefore, periodic recall appointments for observation are necessary, usually on a six-month basis.

  • Making records to determine your unique treatment

    Orthodontic records will be necessary to determine the type of appliances to be used, the duration of treatment time, and the frequency of visits. Records consist of models of the teeth, x-rays, and photographs.

What is Phase II Treatment?

Sixteen new permanent teeth will be erupted between the ages of 10 and 12 years old. Once our orthodontists have determined that the patient is ready for Phase II treatment, we will recommend complete diagnostic records to determine the recommended treatment, treatment length and costs. Phase II treatment can range from 12-24 months.

Second Phase Treatment: Stay healthy and look attractive

The goal of the second phase is to make sure each tooth has an exact location in the mouth where it is in harmony with the lips, cheeks, tongue, and other teeth. When this equilibrium is established, the teeth will function together properly.

  • Movement & Retention

    At the beginning of the first phase, orthodontic records were made and a diagnosis and treatment plan established. Certain types of appliances were used in the first phase, as dictated by the problem. The second phase is initiated when all permanent teeth have erupted, and usually requires braces on all the teeth for an average of 24 months. Retainers are worn after this phase to ensure you retain your beautiful smile.

What is the advantage of two-phase orthodontic treatment?

Two-phase orthodontic treatment is a very specialized process that encompasses tooth straightening and physical, facial changes. The major advantage of a two-phase treatment is to maximize the opportunity to accomplish the ideal healthy, functional, aesthetic result that will remain stable throughout your life.

What if I put off treatment?

The disadvantage of waiting for complete eruption of permanent teeth and having only one phase of treatment for someone with a jaw discrepancy is facing the possibility of a compromised result that may not be stable.

How long does orthodontic treatment take?

Treatment times vary on a case-by-case basis, but the average time is from one to two years. Actual treatment time can be affected by rate of growth and severity of the correction necessary. Treatment length is also dependent upon patient compliance. Maintaining good oral hygiene and keeping regular appointments are important in keeping treatment time on schedule.

How much do braces cost?

Costs for orthodontic treatment vary according to the severity of the problem and length and complexity of treatment. Fees plus arrangements are fully discussed at the consultation appointment.

Will insurance pay for orthodontic care?

Many patients have orthodontic benefits as part of their dental plan. Please check with your insurance or benefits manager as to the extent of your coverage. Orthodontic insurance generally differs from regular dental insurance in that each insured individual usually has a lifetime maximum benefit for orthodontic services. This benefit is paid as a percentage of the orthodontic fee until the benefit maximum has been reached. If you have any further questions our office will be glad to assist you with your insurance needs.

How long do I wear retainers?

Our orthodontists believe that the retention phase is for life. Teeth can always move throughout your life and for this reason we provide you with retainers that only need to be worn at night. If you don’t wear retainers the chance of your teeth shifting are very high and can result in a relapse.

What if I lose my retainer?

Your initial set of retainers are included in the treatment fee, however if you lose your retainer, an additional fee will be required and varies based on the different types of retainers. Please call our office immediately to set up an appointment to get fitted for a replacement.

Should I see my general dentist or pediatric dentist while I have my braces?

Yes, you should continue to see your general dentist every six months for cleanings and dental checkups.

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Upper Front Teeth Protrusion

The appearance and function of your teeth are impacted by this type of bite. It is characterized by the upper teeth extending too far forward or the lower teeth not extending far enough forward.

upper_teeth

Crowding

Crowding occurs when teeth have insufficient room to erupt from the gum. Crowding can often be corrected by expansion, and many times, tooth removal can be avoided.

crowding

Overbite

The upper front teeth extend out over the lower front teeth, sometimes causing the lower front teeth to bite into the roof of the mouth.

overbite

Spacing

The upper front teeth extend out over the lower front teeth, sometimes causing the lower front teeth to bite into the roof of the mouth.

spacing

Crossbite

The upper teeth sit inside the lower teeth, which may cause tooth stratification and misaligned jaw growth.

crossbite

Openbite

Proper chewing is impacted by this type of bite, in which the upper and lower front teeth do not overlap. Openbite may cause a number of unwanted habits, such as tongue thrusting.

openbite

Underbite

underbite

Dental Midline Mismatch

dentalmidline

Mouth Breathing

Normal mouth rest posture is with the lips together with the tongue resting in the palate (roof of the mouth) and breathing done through the nose. In mouth breathers, the tongue is moved down and forward, and the lips are apart to allow air to pass in and out of the mouth. In children, mouth breathing can change the normal development of the palate, narrowing the palate, leading to increased crowding of the upper teeth and not letting the teeth fit together properly for chewing. While mouth breathing can just be a habit, often, it is because the child has developed chronic allergies, which constricts the nasal airways, or enlarged tonsils and/or adenoids, which will also limit the ability to breath through the nose. Be sure to have your children's physician check for any airway constrictions that would prevent your children from normal breathing function and speech development.

寻找最好的牙齿矫正... Clinic Orthodontie1.ch Sàrl offers affordable orthodontic treatment in the latest innovations of orthodontic technology, including self-ligating (metal & clear) braces, lingual (behind the teeth) braces, Invisalign®, Harmony®, eClips® and Incognito®. We serve Suisse Romande: Vaud, Neuchtâl, Geneva, Valais, Jura, Fribourg. The region of Lausanne and the Neuchtâl - North Vaud – South Friborg Triangle

Types braces

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